Nutritional Guidelines from Weston Price

From Years of Cultural Research and Personal Experience

This is mostly copied from the Weston Price Foundation with comments and opinions from Pete at NaturalHealthWay.com*

1. Eat whole, natural foods.

2. Eat only foods that will spoil, but eat them before they do.

3. Eat naturally-raised meat including fish, seafood, poultry, beef, lamb, game, organ meats and eggs.

4. Eat whole, naturally-produced milk products from pasture-fed cows, preferably raw and/or fermented, such as whole yogurt, cultured butter, whole cheeses and fresh and sour cream.

5. It’s Best to Use only traditional fats and oils including raw butter and other animal fats, extra virgin olive oil, expeller expressed sesame and flax oil and the tropical oils—coconut and palm.

6. Eat fresh fruits and vegetables, preferably organic, in salads and soups, or lightly steamed.

7. Use whole grains and nuts that have been prepared by soaking, sprouting or sour leavening to neutralize phytic acid and other anti-nutrients.

8. Include enzyme-enhanced lacto-fermented vegetables, fruits, beverages and condiments in your diet on a regular basis.

9. Prepare homemade meat stocks from the bones of chicken, beef, lamb or fish and use liberally in soups and sauces.   Note from Pete at NaturalhealthWay.com: I believe from research and experience that foods are healthiest eaten in there raw state or heated no higher than 160 degrees. Temperatures not much higher than this can cause fats and cholesterol to oxidize and other harmful chemicals to be created.  Sometimes I make soups/broths with chicken lamb, beef, or buffalo in a slow cooker heated to 160 degrees. Not only does the meat taste better when heated no higher than this, but more nutrients are retained and the healthy fats and cholesterol are not changed to an unhealthy oxidized state*.

10. Use herb teas and coffee substitutes in moderation.

11. Use filtered water for cooking and drinking.

12. Use unrefined Celtic sea salt and a variety of herbs and spices for food interest and appetite stimulation.

13. Make your own salad dressing using raw vinegar, extra virgin olive oil and expeller expressed flax oil.

14. Use natural sweeteners in moderation, such as raw honey, maple syrup, dehydrated cane sugar juice and stevia powder.

15. Use only unpasteurized wine or beer in strict moderation with meals.

16. Cook only in stainless steel, cast iron, glass or good quality enamel.

17. Use only natural supplements.

18. Get plenty of sleep, exercise and natural light.

19. Think positive thoughts and minimize stress.

20. Practice forgiveness.

Dietary Dangers

1. Don’t eat commercially processed foods such as cookies, cakes, crackers, TV dinners, soft drinks, packaged sauce mixes, etc.

2. Avoid all refined sweeteners such as sugar, dextrose, glucose and high fructose corn syrup.

3. Avoid white flour, white flour products and white rice.

4. Avoid all hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated fats and oils.

5. Avoid all vegetable oils made from soy, corn, safflower, canola or cottonseed.

6. Do not use polyunsaturated oils for cooking, sauteing or baking.

7. Avoid fried foods

8. Do not practice strict vegetarianism (veganism); animal products provide vital nutrients not found in plant foods.

9. Avoid products containing protein powders.

10. Avoid pasteurized milk; do not consume lowfat milk, skim milk, powdered milk or imitation milk products.

11. Avoid battery-produced eggs and factory-farmed meats.

12. Avoid highly processed luncheon meats and sausage containing MSG and other additives.

13. Avoid rancid and improperly prepared seeds, nuts and grains found in granolas, quick rise breads and extruded breakfast cereals, as they block mineral absorption and cause intestinal distress.

14. Avoid canned, sprayed, waxed, bioengineered or irradiated fruits and vegetables.

15. Avoid artificial food additives, especially MSG, hydrolyzed vegetable protein and aspartame, which are neurotoxins. Most soups, sauce and broth mixes and commercial condiments contain MSG, even if not so labeled.

16. Avoid caffeine-containing beverages such as coffee, tea and soft drinks. Avoid chocolate.

17. Avoid aluminum-containing foods such as commercial salt, baking powder and antacids. Do not use aluminum cookware or aluminum-containing deodorants.

18. Do not drink fluoridated water.

19. Avoid synthetic vitamins and foods containing them.

20. Do not drink distilled liquors.

21. Do not use a microwave oven.

22. Note from Pete at NaturalhealthWay.com: I believe from research and experience that foods are healthiest eaten in there raw state or heated no higher than 160 degrees. Temperatures not much higher than this can cause fats and cholesterol to oxidize and other harmful chemicals to be created.I regularly eat raw egg yolks, raw butter, and raw grass-fed meat and my health has improved greatly as a result. Sometimes I make soups with chicken lamb, beef, or buffalo in a slow cooker heated to 160 degrees. Not only does the meat taste better when heated no higher than this, but more nutrients are retained and the healthy fats and cholesterol are not changed to an unhealthy oxidized state*.

Traditional Diets

1. The diets of healthy primitive and non-industrialized peoples contain no refined or denatured foods such as refined sugar or corn syrup; white flour; canned foods; pasteurized, homogenized, skim or low-fat milk; refined or hydrogenated vegetable oils; protein powders; artificial vitamins or toxic additives and colorings.

2. All traditional cultures consume some sort of animal protein and fat from fish and other seafood; water and land fowl; land animals; eggs; milk and milk products; reptiles; and insects.

3. Primitive diets contain at least four times the calcium and other minerals and TEN times the fat soluble vitamins from animal fats (vitamin A, vitamin D and the Price Factor) as the average American diet.

4. In all traditional cultures, some animal products are eaten raw.

5. Primitive and traditional diets have a high food-enzyme content from raw dairy products, raw meat and fish; raw honey; tropical fruits; cold-pressed oils; wine and unpasteurized beer; and naturally preserved, lacto-fermented vegetables, fruits, beverages, meats and condiments.

6. Seeds, grains and nuts are soaked, sprouted, fermented or naturally leavened in order to neutralize naturally occuring antinutrients in these foods, such as phytic acid, enzyme inhibitors, tannins and complex carbohydrates.

7. Total fat content of traditional diets varies from 30% to 80% but only about 4% of calories come from oils naturally occurring in grains, pulses, nuts, fish, animal fats and vegetables. The balance of fat calories is in the form of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids.

8. Traditional diets contain nearly equal amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids.

9. All primitive diets contain some salt.

10. Traditional cultures consume animal bones, usually in the form of gelatin-rich bone broths.
Note from Pete at NaturalhealthWay.com: I believe from research and experience that foods are healthiest eaten in there raw state or heated no higher than 160 degrees. Temperatures not much higher than this can cause fats and cholesterol to oxidize and other harmful chemicals to be created.  Sometimes I make
soups/broths with chicken lamb, beef, or buffalo in a slow cooker heated to 160 degrees. Not only does the meat taste better when heated no higher than this, but more nutrients are retained and the healthy fats and cholesterol are not changed to an unhealthy oxidized state*.

11. Traditional cultures make provisions for the health of future generations by providing special nutrient-rich foods for parents-to-be, pregnant women and growing children; by proper spacing of children; and by teaching the principles of right diet to the young.

 

Ten Commandments for avoiding Heart Disease

1. Don’t smoke. If you find it impossible to quit, at least try to cut back and smoke only additive-free cigarettes. Smokers should avoid polyunsaturated oils at all costs. Saturated fats and vitamins A and D are particularly protective of the lungs.

2. Exercise regularly but you needn’t overdo. A brisk daily walk, 10 minutes on the trampoline, swimming and sports are all appropriate.

3. Avoid overweight by eating nutrient-dense foods and keeping sweets to a minimum, but avoid crash dieting.

4. Don’t work too hard. Counteract stress by doing something that you love to do everyday. During periods of unavoidable hardship or loss, increase consumption of foods rich in protective nutrients.

5. As much as possible, avoid exposure to fumes, chemicals, pollutants and pesticides.

6. Avoid all processed foods labeled “lowfat” or that contain polyunsaturated vegetable oils, hydrogenated fats, white flour, refined sugar and additives.

7. Consume high-quality animal products including a variety of sea food and milk, butter, cheese, eggs, meat, fats and organ meats from animals raised on green pasture.

8. Consume a variety of fresh vegetables and fruits, preferably organically grown.

9. Ensure sufficient mineral intake by using whole dairy products; bone broths; and whole grains, legumes and nuts that have been properly prepared to reduce phytic acid and other factors that block mineral absorption.

10. Supplement the diet with foods rich in protective factors including small amounts of cod liver oil (vitamins A and D); wheat germ oil (vitamin E); flax oil (omega-3 fatty acids); kelp (iodine); brewers yeast (B vitamins); desiccated liver (vitamin B12); rose hip or acerola powder (vitamin C); and coconut oil (antimicrobial fatty acids).

Source : The Weston A Price Foundation
 


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* Results may vary from person to person | Health Disclaimer